Emerging Leaders Program

ACE Track: Emerging Leaders

ICLD 1.5 Leadership and Change: Discussion Board

Instructor: Dr. Mitch
Replies
17
Voices
10
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 

17 Comments

  • I am a Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPAC) evaluator and am testing the system.

  • I am a Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPAC) evaluator and am testing the system.

  • I agree with the sentiment that change is often difficult. However, properly managed, change can have very constructive outcomes.

    My positive experiences with change have been very much in line with Chief Tobia’s strategies for successful change. Perhaps the most relevant strategy among those discussed is the need to identify and involve those who will be affected by the change. This critical component goes a long way toward ensuring buy-in from all impacted parties.

    Several years ago, my department considered changing the shift schedule for the Patrol Division. There were three different options on the table. The Patrol Lieutenant made time to meet with each shift, explaining the different possibilities and listening to feedback provided. Ultimately, the selected model was by far the most popular, and very few complaints were voiced, because those impacted had an opportunity to provide input and be a part of the decision process.

    What could have been a very controversial change was perceived as being positive, because of the way it was managed.

    • We had a similar meeting with our patrol major a few years ago regarding the mid-shift schedule. The mid-shift is specifically our training squad, but they are also our relief squad. After a lot of mathematic related queries were done, it was determined the shift did not appropriately cover the busier hours throughout the day. So the shift was moved to two hours earlier. Before this decision was made, a LOT of people were brought in and the pros and cons were weighed out. Although the decision ultimately fell to the major, the affected persons felt like they had an active role in the decision making process. When the change finally came down the ranks, it was much less contested and welcomed by patrol.

  • Change is definitely difficult. But the element I believe I am taking away the most from this lecture is to reward effort over rewarding achievements. I supervise a squad of 8 members. Of those eight, I pretty regularly get half of them who complain about every change the agency is going through. Often I will set goals in the hopes that these members will achieve those goals and will become more open to the change, or at the very least, accommodatable. I never thought about how important it might be to my squad that I reward them for the effort they are putting in, even if that effort doesn’t immediately lead to ultimate successes. Like Chief Tobia said, sometimes the greatest successes fail on the heels of great failures.

    • I think “reward effort over rewarding achievements” can be a slippery slope because it could lead to those who already achieve to sit back and just show effort without even trying to achieve.

  • During this lecture, we learned organizations need to find the right amount of disequilibrium. Too much and “you’ll fall right on your face.” Too little, and the “change will not make much of a difference.” I wonder what the failure rate for organizations trying to implement change is. This week’s topic helped me understand why my organization puts so much time, effort and money promoting their changes. I’ve witnessed some of their changes fail and some succeed. Whether fail or succeed, I believe my organization makes all changes to grow.

    • I agree that being able to explain to promote change instead of simply implementing it is correct. Giving the workers a heads up of what is coming in ahead of time depending on the situation, will show the light at the end of the tunnel when related to GO/LED changes.

    • There is most likely always failure with changes within an agency. People rebel to change, or the change may not be clear and concise. Agencies hope that changes will grow their organization to become better as one .

  • I have had the opportunity to be a part of an organizational change at my previous agency. The agency being as small as it was made the changes highly noticeable and easier for those to resist those efforts in a positive manner. The change had an overall appeal and mid-range to long-term goals. Those that do not see the positive and only like coasting through had the most to lose without seeing the pride in the profession or in their respective position. Maintaining their status quo was ok without looking forward to the possibilities, which often made it appear to themselves as they are being directly attacked due to non-conformity. I was able to see that as a few accepted the change, more and more started to follow. The ones that did not change at all were extremely bitter and hopeless, eventually succumbing to termination or resignation. Change is good in some cases (large or small scale), but having those explain it in better terms or show the overall goals is extremely important.

    • Unfortunately, there are individuals who are so set in their ways that they don’t even want to try to see if the new way will actually be better for them and the department as a whole. It is very sad when these individuals want to dig their heels in, they end up causing more damage to themselves; as management starts to view them as being defiant and unable to follow orders. This can absolutely lead to them resigning, be terminated, and/or tarnish their reputation.

  • Change is definitely difficult but can be a fresh start as well. I believe change is more difficult to overcome for people of seniority in the work environment. People become complacent in their job. They are happy with how things are and have been for awhile. The attitude towards change will always affect the outcome of how the changes can go. New policies and procedures are changed frequently here in my agency. I personally have had my share of questioning the change but never upset or angry towards it. I believe being optimistic and staying positive is a good way for changes that come into play.

    • I have to agree that change can be difficult but good at the same time. The whole idea behind change is to make procedures easier and more efficient. In my department we have had several changes over the years, and it is always interesting to me that a majority of members are not enthused by the changes. I always say if the “new” way isn’t working there isn’t anything preventing us from going back to the “old” way but how are we going to know if we don’t try. I do believe that since we have implemented having more communication about the change and soliciting feedback from frontline staff it has increased their willingness to change. However, we also have to remember that not everyone is going to be happy or excited about the change and sometimes the change has to be implemented for the better of the operations.

    • I can see how those who have seniority would be the most resistive. It could be that they have achieved what they want in their careers and don’t have the motivation to actively participate in the change because they see no personal gain from it.

  • When members of an agency or department think about change we immediately think that most individuals do not like change and are not going to be accepting to the changes that are going to come about. However, if we were to look at in a different lenses, it isn’t the fact they don’t like change they are stressed about how it is going to affect them personally. The leaders implementing the change should definitely solicit feedback from frontline staff to determine how the changes is going to directly impact them, if the change is feasible for productivity and operations and to also determine the best way to get members to buy into the change. I found it interesting that when presenting the change to members you have to provide the pros and cons to the change as well as the pros to cons to not implementing this change (Tobia, 2017). This will allow them to understand why the new process is being implemented, how it is going to benefit members and how it would affect operations if it wasn’t implemented. If these reasons are communicated to staff prior to implementation there is a better chance they will be accepting of the change and have more of a buy in instead of resisting it.
    Reference
    Tobia, M. (2017). Leadership and change. 1.5, Week # 2. National Command and Staff College. Retrieved from https://cloud.scorm.com/content/courses
    /NAGVXPB5E6/ LeadershipandChangea861f98d-6cd1-46aa-a8f7-07e964fced62/2/index_lms.html

  • I have to agree that change can be difficult but good at the same time. The whole idea behind change is to make procedures easier and more efficient. In my department we have had several changes over the years, and it is always interesting to me that a majority of members are not enthused by the changes. I always say if the “new” way isn’t working there isn’t anything preventing us from going back to the “old” way but how are we going to know if we don’t try. I do believe that since we have implemented having more communication about the change and soliciting feedback from frontline staff it has increased their willingness to change. However, we also have to remember that not everyone is going to be happy or excited about the change and sometimes the change has to be implemented for the better of the operations.

  • This lecture was very insightful to those new to leadership positions. Its very important for a successful leader to understand their subordinates wants and desires and how they will react to any kind of changes that you implement. By understanding the subordinates wants in their career, you are able to structure your plans in a way that will not cause a loss in morale and efficiency.

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